Meaning, Concept and types of Curriculum


Meaning, Concept and types of Curriculum.

Introduction:

Curriculum is an important element of education. Aims of education are reflected in the curriculum. In other words, the curriculum is determined by the aims of life and society. Aims of life and society are subject to constant change.

Hence, the aims of education are also subject to change and dynamic. The aims of education are attained by the school programmes, concerning knowledge, experiences, activities, skills and values. The different school programmes are jointly known as curriculum.

Meaning of Curriculum:

Curriculum meaning – The term curriculum has been derived from a Latin word ‘Currere’ which means a ‘race course’ or a runway on which one runs to reach a goal. Accordingly, a curriculum is the instructional and the educative programme by following which the pupils achieve their goals, ideals and aspirations of life. It is curriculum through which the general aims of a school education receive concrete expression.

Traditional concept-The traditional curriculum was subject-centered while the modern curriculum is child and life-centered.

Modern Concept of Curriculum:

Modern education is the combination of two dynamic processes. The one is the process of individual development and the other is the process of socialization, which is commonly known as adjustment with the social environment.

Definition of Curriculum:

The curriculum meaning has been defined by different writers in different ways:

  1. Cunningham – “Curriculum is a tool in the hands of the artist (teacher) to mould his material (pupils) according to his ideas (aims and objectives) in his studio (school)”.
  2. Morroe – “Curriculum includes all those activities which are utilized by the school to attain the aims of education.
  3. Froebel – “Curriculum should be conceived as an epitome of the rounded whole of the knowledge and experience of the human race.”
  4. Crow and Crow – The term curriculum includes all the learners’ experience in or outside school that are included in a programme which has been devised to help him developmentally, emotionally, socially, spiritually and morally”.
  5. T.P. Nunn-“The core curriculum should be viewed as various forms of activities that are grand expressions of human sprit and that are of the greatest and most permanent significance to the wide world”.

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Exponents of child-centered education
Q. Exponents of child-centered education

All the progressive educationists like Rousseau, Pestalozzi, Froebel, Montessori, Tagore, Gandhi and many others have advocated the cause of the child. They have stressed that the teaching programmes and the teaching process should be based the capacities and requirements of children.

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Activity-centered curriculum is a modern approach in curriculum development
Activity-centered curriculum is a modern approach in curriculum development

Meaning and Nature
Activity-centered curriculum is a modern approach in curriculum development. It is a reaction against the traditional curriculum which was subject-centered or teacher dominated. Child centered education and activity movement led to the concept of activity-centered curriculum.

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Complete information on the meaning and principles of curriculum construction
Complete information on the meaning and principles of curriculum construction

Meaning of Curriculum:
The term curriculum has been derived from a Latin word ‘Currere’ which means a ‘race course’ or a runway on which one runs to reach a goal. Accordingly, a curriculum is the instructional and the educative programme by following which the pupils achieve their goals, ideals and aspirations of life.

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Experience curriculum and Subject-centered curriculum
Experience curriculum and Subject-centered curriculum

The two curricula are poles apart. Subject-centered curriculum provides knowledge with pupils remaining passive for most of the time. Experience curriculum actively involves the learners. Thomson Hopkins has compared and contrasted the two types of curriculum

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